Search results for "POLITICS AND LITERATURE"

Politics and Literature

First published in French magazines in the 1960s, the essays and interviews collected in this volume tackle two of Sartre’s most enduring concerns as a philosopher: politics and literature. With regard to the former, they develop the notion of the intellectual not only as an aloof theoretician, but also as a constructive agent of change. His writings on literature explore the limitations of language as an exact vehicle for meaning, the author’s lack of ownership of his own words and the avenues that certain types of theatre such as Artaud’s open for non-verbal communication. A useful, concise introduction to Sartre’s thinking, Politics and Literature investigates concepts and highlights conflicts, interrogations and debates that remain topical and relevant to this day.

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Thank you for clicking through. As we said in our email, you can choose to hear only about literature-specific titles: switch to the English/French/Italian/Russian/Spanish/German/American newsletters by filling in this quick form below. If you’d like to request any inspection copies, you can contact Alex at agingell@almabooks.com, or head to the Inspection Copy Request Form. Thanks! The Alma Academic Team Name* First Last Email address* Which newsletter would you like to receive?*English LiteratureFrench LiteratureItalian LiteratureRussian LiteratureSpanish LiteratureGerman LiteratureAmerican LiteratureOther LiteratureInstitution nameAddress Street Address Address Line 2 City County / State / Region ZIP / Postal Code AfghanistanÅland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAmerican SamoaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBoliviaBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and Herz…

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2016: A Year in Books for Adults

  It’s been a difficult year for many, but Alma’s 2016 has gone from strength to strength… Below is a round-up of the publishers’ favourite projects from this year, highlighting the diverse nature of our publishing ethos with a hefty amount of literature in translation. (See also A Year in Books for Children)     January A Game of Chess and Other Stories When it is discovered that the reigning world chess champion, Mirko Czentovic, is on board a cruiser heading for Buenos Aires, a fellow passenger challenges him to a game. Czentovic easily defeats him, but during the rematch a mysterious Austrian, Dr B., intervenes and, to the surprise of everyone, helps the underdog obtain a draw. When, the next day, Dr B. confides in a compatriot travelling on the same ship and decides to reveal the harrowing secret behind his formidable chess knowledge, a chilling tale of imprisonment and psychological torment unfolds. RRP: £4.99 £3.99       February Diaboliad In Bulgak…

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A Room of One’s Own

A seminal, widely studied feminist polemic that touches on both literature and politics, A Room of One’s Own is essential reading for those wishing to understand the progress that has been made in women’s rights and the struggles that still lie ahead

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A Year in Translation

Over the last decade, we have focused on bringing the best classics in translation into the English language and to celebrating the best of world literature – this month, we’ve rounded up our top ten classics in translation:   A Game of Chess Stefan Zweig’s last and most famous story, ‘A Game of Chess’ was written in exile in Brazil and explores its author’s anxieties about the situation in Europe following the rise of the Nazi regime. The tale is presented here in a brand-new translation, along with three of the master storyteller’s most acclaimed novellas: Twenty-four Hours in the Life of a Woman, The Invisible Collection and Incident on Lake Geneva. By: Stefan Zweig ISBN: 9781847495815 £4.99     Journey by Moonlight Originally written in 1937, and here presented in a brilliant new translation by Peter V. Czipott, Antal Szerb’s gently humorous and psychologically subtle exploration into the workings of a budding bourgeois marriage has been hailed as one of the great re…

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Order Forms

Jump to AIs | Order Forms | Presentations   AIs Below are the AIs for 2020. If you need any other AIs, please contact us. January The Awakening (Evergreen) March The Prophet (Evergreen) The Life of Castruccio Castracani (101 Pages) Finnegans Wake (Alma Classics) The Heretic of Soana (Calder Publications) April The Warden (Evergreen) Jacob’s Room (Alma Classics) King Solomon’s Mines (Alma Junior Classics) May Bleak House (Evergreen) Mademoiselle de Scudéri (101 Pages) My Life with Boris (Alma Books – Contemporary Non-Fiction) The Bears’ Famous Invasion of Sicily (Alma Junior Classics) June Pushkin Lyrics Vol. 3 (Alma Classics/Poetry) Tales from Russian Folklore (Alma Classics) The Story of the Treasure Seekers (Alma Junior Classics) July The Mother (Alma Classics) Uncle’s Dream (Alma Classics) Wilhelm Meister (Alma Classics) Selected Poems: Blake (Alma Classics/Poetry) The Secret Agent (Evergreen) The Art of War (Evergreen) With the Flow (101 Pages) August Sons and Lovers (Evergree…

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Neil Cornwell

Neil Cornwell is Professor Emeritus (Russian and Comparative Literature) at the University of Bristol. Having studied at SSEES (University of London) he taught at the New University of Ulster (Coleraine) and Queen’s University (Belfast). He has translated works by Odoevsky, Mayakovsky, Lermontov and Daniil Kharms. His authored books include The Literary Fantastic (1990) and The Absurd in Literature (2006), as well as works on Odoevsky, Pasternak, Pushkin, James Joyce and Nabokov. He is also the editor of Reference Guide to Russian Literature (1998).

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Life of Dante

Life of Dante brings together the earliest accounts of Dante available, putting the celebratory essay of literary genius Giovanni Boccaccio together with the historical analysis of leading humanist Leonardo Bruni. Their writings, along with the other sources included in this volume, provide a wealth of insight and information into Dante’s unique character and life, from his susceptibility to the torments of passionate love, his involvement in politics, scholastic enthusiasms and military experience, to the stories behind the greatest heights of his poetic achievements. Not only are these accounts invaluable for their subject matter, they are also seminal examples of early biographical writing. Also included in this volume is a biography of Boccaccio, perhaps as great an influence on world literature as Dante himself.

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20 New Books

  Prosecco: The Wine and the People Who Made it a SuccessLuigi Bolzon£16.99 £8.50BUY David CopperfieldCharles Dickens£6.99 £3.50BUY Jude the ObscureThomas Hardy£5.99 £3.00BUY Loveless LoveLuigi Pirandello£5.99 £3.00BUY Manon LescautAntoine François Prévost£7.99 £4.00BUY Moll FlandersDaniel Defoe£5.99 £3.00BUY The Canterbury TalesGeoffrey Chaucer£5.99 £3.00BUY The Four Little Girls and Desire Caught by the TailPablo Picasso£5.99 £3.00BUY The Government InspectorNikolai Gogol£7.99 £4.00BUY The Last of the MohicansJames Fenimore Cooper£5.99 £3.00BUY The Monk: A RomanceMatthew Gregory Lewis£7.99 £4.00BUY The Owl and the Pussycat and Other Nonsense PoetryEdward Lear£7.99 £4.00BUY The Song of Roland£8.99 £4.00BUY A Funny Sort of MinisterDominique Demers£6.99 £3.50BUY BabelAlan Burns£8.99 £4.50BUY BusterAlan Bu…

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The Very Thought of You: Readers’ Notes

Notes For a Readers’ Group (May 16th 2010), by Rosie Alison The Very Thought of You by Rosie Alison 1. How would you describe the story of The Very Thought of You? A young girl from London is evacuated to a Yorkshire country house during World War Two, where she finds herself part-witness, part-accomplice to a love affair, with unexpected emotional repercussions through her adult life. 2. What inspired the story behind The Very Thought of You? Ten years ago I was trying to write a contemporary novel set it in London, where I have lived all my adult life. But something was holding me back. I kept finding myself diverted back to my childhood, and in particular to a somewhat run-down stately home on the North York Moors where I spent my formative years (aged 8-12). But I felt very resistant to converting my 1970s boarding school experiences into a novel; that would have been too direct and personal. Yet all that changed when I was researching a documentary about the novelist Elizabeth Bow…

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